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How to Buy Disney Stock

Andrew Goldman

Andrew Goldman has been writing for over 20 years and investing for the past 10 years. He currently writes about personal finance and investing for Wealthsimple. Andrew's past work has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, New York Magazine and Wired. Television appearances include NBC's Today show as well as Fox News. Andrew holds a Bachelor of Arts (English) from the University of Texas. He and his wife Robin live in Westport, Connecticut with their two boys and a Bedlington terrier. In his spare time, he hosts “The Originals" podcast.

So you’re impressed with the cut of the Disney CEO Bob Iger’s jib. You spent your entire European vacation inside Disneyland Paris, stand in line for hours to be first into the theater for every Star Wars movie, and you even sport an unironic Huey, Dewey and Louie tattoo in a very private place. You love Disney with such a burning intensity that since you're not allowed to marry it you want to at least own a little piece of it. Given that between 2013 and 2019 the stock price about doubled, we understand the attraction, just remember past performance doesn't guarantee future results. But show up at Disney's Burbank, CA headquarters waving a mitt full of money and you’ll sooner end up in a padded cell in the Magic Kingdom than a shareholders meeting. What’s it going to take for you to own some Disney stock (symbol: DIS)?

It’s surprisingly easy to buy Disney stock, or any other that’s publicly traded. The process requires just two things: a broker to make the trade and enough money to buy at least one share. Unfortunately, we’re unable to help out with the money part, but we’ve got the other two covered here.

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1. Decide if Disney stock is the only stock you want to buy

We’d like a word before you buy anything. Are you absolutely sure you want to buy an individual stock? Stock picking is extraordinarily hard to do well. Famously rich stock picker Warren Buffett has spent the last decades discouraging pretty much everyone not named Warren Buffet from trying to make money picking individual stocks, he proclaimed: “The goal of the non-professional should not be to pick winners — neither he nor his 'helpers' can do that — but should rather be to own a cross-section of businesses that in aggregate are bound to do well.” One stock does not a cross section make. An aggregate of companies, not to mention bonds and real estate, can easily be bought by investing through a robo-advisor. It's up to you to decide if you know better than the financial Yoda with the £81 billion net worth.

Picking individuals stocks is a lot like playing the lottery. The top best performing 4% of stocks accounted for the entire wealth creation of the US stock market since 1926, which means there were lots and lots of losing stock pickers. Are you sure DIS is going to continue its mind-blowing trajectory for the long haul?

If you're sure you want to own some DIS, there’s a lot to said for the “mad money” philosophy of investing. If you own a properly diversified investment portfolio and have a little discretionary, or “mad” money on hand you’d like to use to speculate, great. Roll the dice. But a good rule of thumb is that you should gamble with no more than 5% of your entire portfolio.

2. Choose where you want to purchase Disney stock

If you're ready to buy DIS, you have a few choices.

Online brokerage

The absolute easiest, cheapest way to buy stocks is through an online discount brokerage. Accounts can be opened in ten minutes if you have a social security or social insurance number, a home address, and an employer’s address (freelancers fret not—it’s totally AOK if your office happens to be five feet from your bed.)

Account minimums vary considerably in the minimum investment they require to open an account. They also normally charge a fee for each stock you trade. Most will assess a flat per-trade commission fee for any stock purchase, big or small, that generally range from £5-£10 per online trade. If you have a small amount of money to invest, look out for a provider that offers a low minimum investment to open an account. Some, even offer no minimum investment and in the last decade, a few investment providers have started offering commission-free trading, so every cent you pay goes directly into your stock investment, not into the brokerage’s coffers.

Human stock broker

Most brokerages do employ humans to execute stock trades, but they’ll charge a lot more if you need to use one, so do your best to crack the system without the assistance of another warm body. If you're nervous, you'll find scads of videos for buying stocks on all the major online brokerages on YouTube.

Financial advisor

If you have a financial advisor, you may choose to execute the trade through him or her. The best advisors are “fee-only,” meaning they’ll either charge you a flat fee or take a small percentage of the value of your portfolio every year and hopefully won’t nickel and dime you with inflated trading fees for the purchase of one stock. Financial advisors are useful for providing you with an overall financial plan but you probably don't need one to trade individual stocks.

Automated investing

In general, automated investing services (sometimes called roboadvisors) like yours truly will put together a diversified basket of ETFs for their clients based on their investment goals rather than individual stocks. Wealthsimple’s patron saint, after all, is Harry Markowitz, the Nobel Prize winning economist whose Modern Portfolio Theory showed that diversification both minimized portfolio volatility while maximizing reward. So who knows—Amazon may well be one of the hundreds of stocks held within a Wealthsimple portfolio, but automated investing services aren’t generally the right place to go if you’re in the market for larger positions in individual stocks like Amazon.

3. Determine how much money you want to invest in Disney stock

Not to sound like a broken record, but again, try to avoid putting any more than 5% of your total investment portfolio in individual stocks. Currently, DIS's share price is within the budget of most investors so you’ll have no trouble buying one or several shares, unlike, for instance, Google, which has become like the Dom Perignon of stock purchases. If you’re the type who depends on your fingers and toes for all math, you’ll be glad to know that most platforms will ask you to plug in your desired investment amount and will then spit out how many shares that amount will buy you.

4. Choose the right order type to buy Disney stock

There are three primary order types online platforms will provide for stock purchase.

Market order:

If your money is burning a hole in your pocket and you need your DIS right now, choose this type. If stock markets are open, it will execute the trade immediately, or just as soon as the market opens next. The price you will pay will be right around the latest traded price for the stock, give or take a few cents per share.

Limit order:

DIS experiencing what looks like a momentary inflated stock price you suspect will soon float down to earth? Execute a limit order in this case. You’ll plug in the lowest price you’d be willing to pay for DIS, and just as soon as it crosses that threshold (provided it ever does) your purchase of DIS will be automatically executed.

Stop order:

Want to buy or sell DIS but not at its current price? Pick any price you like. This is called a stop price. Perhaps you want to sell it if it goes below a certain threshold. For this, you would place what's called a sell-stop order. Or maybe you want to buy when it falls below a certain price. For this, you’d want to a buy-stop order. Either scenario would automatically trigger a market order, or purchase, at that moment.

5. Purchase Disney stock

You're so close to owning DIS now! One word of caution: Online platforms are pretty careful to avoid executing unwanted trades, so they will generally show you a screen showing exactly what you’re about to buy before you buy it. It might look like you’ve already made an order for DIS, but you may still need to hit a “trade,” or “execute trade” button. Most platforms will immediately email you a confirmation of your purchase. Congratulations, you stock trader you. Try not turn into a weeping mess when Tim Cook appears at the next Amazon shareholders meeting.

Got your Disney and now need help creating a diversified, low-cost portfolio? Consider Wealthsimple. We offer state of the art technology and the kind of personalized, friendly service you might have not thought imaginable from an automated investing service — sign up now.

Last Updated February 27, 2019

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