2022 Income Tax Calculator Manitoba

2022 free Manitoba income tax calculator to quickly estimate your provincial taxes. Get better visibility to your tax bracket, marginal tax rate, average tax rate, payroll tax deductions, tax refunds or taxes owed in 2022.

Your Results

  • Total income
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  • Total tax
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    Federal Tax
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    Provincial Tax
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  • After-tax income
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  • Average tax rate
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    Marginal tax rate
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Summary

Please enter your income, deductions, gains, dividends, and taxes paid to get a summary of your results.

These calculations are approximate and include the following non-refundable tax credits: the basic personal tax amount, CPP/QPP, QPIP, and EI premiums, and the Canada employment amount. After-tax income is your total income net of federal tax, provincial tax, and payroll tax. Rates are up to date as of June 22, 2021.

Manitoba Provincial 
and Federal tax brackets

Your taxable income places you in the following tax brackets.

Canadian federal tax bracketCanadian federal tax rate
$49,020 or less15.00%
$49,020 - $98,04020.50%
$98,040 - $151,97826.00%
$151,978 - $216,51129.00%
More than $216,51133.00%
Manitoba tax bracketManitoba tax rate
first $34,43110.80%
over $34,431 up to $74,41612.75%
over $74,41617.40%
How to calculate Manitoba net income?

Here is a step-by-step guide to calculating your province net income in Manitoba.

Determine taxable income by deducting any pre-tax contributions to benefits Your taxable income is your entire salary including wages, tips, bonuses, and income from other sources that you received in one tax year. To calculate your yearly taxable income, multiply your monthly salary by 12 and then add all the additional benefits, bonuses, or other types of income you received in that specific tax year.

From your total taxable income, you need to deduct any pre-tax benefits, allowed deductions and credits such as charitable donations. What you now have left is your taxable income on which the government imposes the tax. A salary calculator Manitoba can be used to calculate your net income.

Withhold all applicable taxes (federal and provincial) Once you have your taxable income, you need to find out if the applicable federal and provincial taxes are withheld from your salary. Your employer could be withholding taxes from your salary and paying your taxes to the government directly. If your employer remits the taxes, you don’t have to pay taxes again. After filing tax returns, you might only have to pay taxes on other income.

Deduct any post-tax contributions to benefits A post-tax contribution is money paid into an investment or retirement account after tax has been deducted from your income. Post-tax contributions may help you reduce your income tax burden after retirement.

Garnish wages, if necessary Garnish wages refer to a situation when an employer directly pays an employee’s specified portion of salary to the government, Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), or a person designated by the government by a court order.

The result is net income After deducting all the pre-tax contributions, post-tax contributions, and taxes, you’ll be left with your net income or take-home pay.

Manitoba employment income

Self-employment income
RRSP deduction
Capital gains
Eligible dividends
Ineligible dividends
Other income (incl. CERB/CESB)

Self-employment income

Self-employment income

Self-employment income is the income you earn from trade, a profession, commission, or a business such as farming, or fishing. You can be a sole proprietor, professional, independent contractor, or have a partnership business to earn self-employment income. It can be a part-time business activity that helps you gain profit. This can include income from a business, a profession, commission, farming, or fishing.

RRSP deduction

RRSP deduction

The RRSP deduction refers to the amount that a taxpayer can deduct from their income and contribute to a Registered Retirement Savings Plan. The CRA determines the RRSP deduction limit for every taxpayer based on their Manitoba income tax brackets.

Capital gains

Capital gains

Capital gains in Manitoba are taxable and you are legally required to disclose capital gain profits in your tax returns. Depending on the type of capital property you have sold to earn a capital gain, you can calculate and report your capital gain income with the help of Schedule 3, Capital Gains and Losses. Furthermore, Guide T4002 helps self-employed, farmers, professionals, commission-based business persons, and others.

Eligible dividends

Eligible dividends

An eligible dividend is a dividend issued by a Canadian Corporation to Canadian residents and the dividend income is taxable. Most large corporations give out eligible dividends meaning their dividends are taxable. Before a corporation issues a taxable dividend, it issues a notification to its shareholders if the dividend is eligible or not.

Ineligible dividends

Ineligible dividends

Small business corporations in Canada payout ineligible or non-eligible dividends. Ineligible dividends are also called regular, ordinary, and small-business dividends. The ineligible dividends are taxed at a lower rate as compared to eligible dividends. Canadian corporations that are not eligible for an eligible dividend tax credit, payout ineligible dividends.

Other income (incl. CERB/CESB)

Other income (incl. CERB/CESB)

Most government benefits received by a taxpayer are taxable. The Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) and Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB) are taxable as they are a part of a person’s income. Such government benefits are reported on your Tax form in the Other Income section as they are a part of your taxable income.

Other incomes to understand in Manitoba

What is interest income?
What are ordinary dividends?
What are qualified dividends?
What is passive income?
What is short-term capital gain?
What is long-term capital gain?
Other income

What is interest income?

What is interest income?

Interest income refers to the interest payments you receive on your investments such as interest income on preferred shares or bonds. Interest income is taxable under federal laws and is to be reported on your tax form.

What are ordinary dividends?

What are ordinary dividends?

In Canada, ordinary dividends or non-eligible dividends refer to the dividends paid by small corporations which are not eligible for ‘eligible dividend tax credits’. Because the annual turnover of such corporations is lower than other large corporations, their income is also taxed once and at a lower rate. The marginal tax rate for ordinary dividends is 15% if you are in the lowest tax bracket.

What are qualified dividends?

What are qualified dividends?

Qualified dividends are usually called eligible dividends because they are tax eligible. Corporations that pay out eligible dividends are eligible for ‘eligible dividend tax credits’.

What is passive income?

What is passive income?

Passive income is a type of income that you earn while not being actively involved in earning it. For instance, if you rent out a property and earn rental income, it is passive income. Similarly, dividends, royalties, and interest income are passive incomes.

What is short-term capital gain?

What is short-term capital gain?

For instance, if you buy a house for $100,000 and sell it for $120,000, your capital gain is $20,000. Short-term gains are taxable under federal tax laws and can be calculated using Schedule 3.

What is long-term capital gain?

What is long-term capital gain?

Your capital gain tax depends on your tax bracket, your capital gains tax Manitoba will be higher if you are in a higher Manitoba tax bracket. However, if you have earned a capital gain on a property such as your house (if it is your principal residence) ,qualified small business shares, qualified farm or fishing property or reserves brought into income in 2020, that qualify for Lifetime Capital Gains Tax Exemption LCGE, your capital gains won’t be taxable.

Other income

Other income

Other Income is income other than your salary. It can be income from a property you’ve rented out, income from a side business, or income in the form of dividends or interest. Other Income is disclosed in the ‘Other Income’ section at the bottom of tax returns.

Understanding Province Deductions & Credits

What are tax exemptions?
CRA contributions
Mortgage interest
Charitable donations
Student Loan Interest
Child & Dependent Care Expense
College education expense
Mental health credits
Other Deductibles

What are tax exemptions?

What are tax exemptions?

Tax exemption refers to income or a portion of income that is not taxable. If your income is exempt from taxes, you’ll have to report it on your tax returns to benefit from it and reduce your tax liability. For instance if you earn $9,936 or less during the year (Manitoba’s basic personal amount), your income will be exempt from taxes.

CRA contributions

CRA contributions

The CRA has set a maximum amount that you can contribute to your tax-free savings account TFSA. To gain maximum benefit from the maximum TFSA limit, check your TFSA contribution room. Higher contributions to the TFSA can reduce your overall tax liability as contributions to TFSA are not tax deductible for income tax purposes.

Mortgage interest

Mortgage interest

Mortgage interest refers to the interest you pay to the lender when you purchase property on loan. Taxpayers in Canada may be eligible for tax-deductible mortgage payments if their mortgaged property is used to generate rental income.

Charitable donations

Charitable donations

Taxpayers can claim tax credits on charitable donations. If you have been planning to donate a portion of your income, it is beneficial to know that you can claim tax credits on charitable donations that you make to registered charities that are recognized by the Canada Revenue Agency CRA.

Student Loan Interest

Student Loan Interest

Students can also receive several benefits and tax credits offered by the provincial and federal tax authorities. You can receive tax credits as full-time or part-time student in Manitoba. The full-time education amount is $400/month and part-time education amount is $120/month.

Child & Dependent Care Expense

Child & Dependent Care Expense

Eligible families can claim Child benefits in Canada if their children are below 18 years of age. The tax credits are meant to help eligible families with the cost of raising children. Disabled children who are under 18 years of age can also be eligible for disability tax credits and supplemental income up to $2,915 (Jul 2021 - Jun 2022).

College education expense

College education expense

The CRA’s Guide P105, Students and Income Tax can help students find out which tax credits they can claim on their tax returns. If you are a student and want to claim tuition fee tax credits, you can contact your educational institution for a T2202 form. If you are a commuter to the U.S for education or study at a university outside Canada, you can use the form TL11A, TL11C, or TL11D listed on the CRA’s website.

Mental health credits

Mental health credits

The disability tax credits are available to physically challenged taxpayers as well as mentally challenged taxpayers. Mentally impaired individuals can fill out the form T2201 to find out if they are eligible for disability tax credits. Printed application forms and supporting documents must be sent digitally to the CRA to prove the medical conditions.

Other Deductibles

Other Deductibles

Many other such Manitoba tax deductions and tax credits that you could be eligible for, can reduce your overall tax liability. Visit the CRA website or a tax expert to find out how you can reduce the taxes.

FAQs

The Manitoba tax deadline 2021 is April 30th for salaried taxpayers and June 15th for self-employed individuals.

The lowest tax rate in Manitoba is 10.8% for individuals who earn $34,431 or less in one year. If you earn more than $34,431 but less than $74,416, your income above $34,431 will be taxed at 12.75%. So you pay taxes at a 10.80% tax rate on the first $34,431 and 12.7% on the amount above $34,431. However, if you earn more than $74,416, the next portion of your income that is above $74,416 will be taxed at a tax rate of 17.4%.

To calculate your total tax liability in Manitoba, you can use an income tax calculator Manitoba. Or get help from a tax expert who can help you file taxes and reduce taxes where possible.

The amount of tax deducted from your paycheck depends on your annual salary and your pretax contributions.

The federal government charges a carbon tax per ton of fossil fuels emitted by emitters. Because the energy used in Manitoba is virtually emission-free, only the operators who use fossil fuels pay carbon tax. Additionally, the individuals who purchase gasoline, natural gas or propane pay higher prices that include carbon tax. However, the taxpayers will benefit more from the carbon tax in Manitoba by claiming a carbon tax rebate on their tax return.

One should keep tax records for at least six years. Keeping previous years’ tax records ensures if you ever get stuck in a legal problem, you’ll have the information and evidence regarding your tax payments.

In Manitoba, just like most provinces of Canada, the income tax refund takes around 2 weeks to 16 weeks. The CRA may take more or less time depending on the type of claim and when you file it.

To calculate your annual income and annual Manitoba tax liability, you can use the Manitoba tax rate to calculate it manually, use a Manitoba tax calculator or hire a tax professional.

Manitoba tax returns can be filed online by accessing the NETFILE-certified software or a web application. if necessary, it can be mailed to Winnipeg Tax Centre Post Office Box 14001, Station Main, Winnipeg MB R3C 3M3. You don’t have to mail your income-related receipts and slips to the CRA physically.

In Manitoba, capital gains tax has an inclusion rate of 50%. Your tax bracket determines the capital gains tax you’d pay. If your income is $34,431 or less in 2022, the capital gains tax rate will be 25.80%. A tax estimator Manitoba can be used to calculate your income tax liability including capital gains tax.

Withholding tax refers to the amount an employer withholds from the employee's paycheck and pays directly to the CRA. Withholding tax rates in Manitoba are 10.8% on the first $34,431 of taxable income, 12.75% on the next $39,985, and 17.4% on the amount over $74,416.

The Manitoba marginal tax rates depend on your annual income. You can find the marginal tax rates table for Manitoba on the Canada Revenue Agency website. For every dollar you make over $72,885 in Manitoba, you’ll pay a marginal tax rate of 17.4%.

Tax brackets in the Manitoba province decide your tax rate.

  • If your taxable income is below $33,723, you’ll pay taxes at a 10.8% tax rate.
  • If you earn more than $72,885, you’ll pay a 17.4% tax rate on that income.

A take home pay calculator Manitoba can help you calculate your take-home income.

When you sell a house in Manitoba, you pay the land transfer tax on marginal tax rates. The marginal tax rate for first $30,000 is 0%, on the next $60,000 is 0.5%, on the next $60,000 is 1% and so on. On amounts in excess of $200,000, the tax rate is 2%. You can use a Manitoba property tax calculator to find out the amount you’ll owe in taxes when you sell your house.

There are several tax credits that you can claim in Manitoba if you are eligible such as Manitoba family tax benefit, Full-time education amount, fertility treatment tax credit, Labour-Sponsored Funds Tax Credit, and several other tax credits.

You can file income tax returns online through the CRA website using your 9-digit social insurance number and a payment method.

Tax on split income TOSI refers to a special type of income of individuals who were born after the year 2003. You can get help regarding tax on split income on the CRA website using Form T1206.

RRSP can reduce your overall taxes. Consult a tax expert to find out how you can benefit from the maximum Registered Retirement Savings Plan contribution limit.